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. the prime minister yesterday visited a joint united states/israeli missile defense maneuver. there th're preparing for all eventualities. rocket and missile attacks on israel from iran, syria are lebanon and gaza. >> the threat is new and the fact is our forces are being prepared to give a new response. >> the new response is the iron dome anti-missile system. it will be deployed in less than a year. but the fact that remains is from now on, in any future israeli conflict, from the north or the south, the heart of the nation tel aviv will be under threat. >>> today in milan, italy, there >>> today in milan, italy, there was a landmark court ruling regarding a program run by the central intelligence agency known as extraordinary renditn. under that program, terror suspects were secretly detained and flowto foreign countries for interrogations that some have described as torture. today an italian judge convicted 23 americans of kidnapping an egyptian cleric from a milan street in 2003 in one such operation. the cia has declined to comment on the case and all of the americans were tried
this was an utter, unmitigated disaster for the security of the united states and for the interest of the united states in the dangerous world we live in. the sanctimonious comments by general holder today are this, self-serving and self-centered. we ought to be concerned of what is in the interest of the united states of america. you nailed it absolutely right. what good is there to be gained by trying these mass murderers, war criminals in civilian courts with rules designed for conventional crimes committed by conventional criminals as general mukazie once said. they'll challenge the way they were treated and what about the chain of evidence and did we have all the constitutional nicities in a war? they're going to proclaim outrageous treatment and lie about it because they've got the world stage and this will serve to recruit additional jihaddists because they're going to attack america throughout this entire episode, the sorry episode and they're going to try and get support throughout the muslim world for their cause by ex-core eighting -- excoriating the united states of america and our v
is to understand the circumstances that are going on right now in terms of the compromise of the united states sovereignty by what's happening to the dollar with deficits budget to be positive so the last third of this book is solutions. what we can do as a subtitle says fighting new world order, surviving the global depression and preserving u.s. sovereignty. so the themes of this book at the last third or to give solutions and call to action for how we can organize our lives, how we can organize politically in order to fight back to say no to a global new deal. now, to get everyone's mind of around the idea of america for sale, i like to start at this way. we currently have page 24 of the book and document we have got about a 65.5 trillion what the t negative net worth. now what that means, that is according to the department treasury's own statistics. once a year the deeper and the treasury does a gap accounting and david walker, who was the head of the government accountability office actually resigned in 2008 it went on the week up to our alarming people, telling people essentially that i
chief for "alternate." will also talk with a guest about the united states effort to resolve longstanding difference between israelis and palestinians. also note tim brown of the 9/11 network coalition. he will be here to talk was about the december 5 rally in new york against bernanke 9/11 suspects to a federal courthouse in lower manhattan. . . american icons, continues tonight at 8:00 p.m., with the history, art and architecture of the most symbolic structures, tonight at 8:00 p.m. on c-span and get your own copy of american icons, a three-disk set, $24.95. order on-line at c-span.org/store. now a look back at cuban missile crisis, with kennedy advisors ted sornson and carol kasem. from the kennedy library in boston, this is an hour and 15 minutes. this war policy was done in secret and steps were taken to deceive us by every means they could. they were planning in november to open to the world the fact that they had these missiles so close to the united states, not that they are with intending to fire them, because if they were going to get into a niewg clear struggle, th
of the international community but fully engage with the international community and the united states is the one who can do the heavy lifting. there is no question about that. >> rose: and john harris of politiceau.com gives us a one-year analysis of the oa administration. >> the idea that president obama and his team were able to somehow transform the map and transform the political geography of this country or the political demography of this country, that just doesn't look to be the case. they did redraw the map in 2008. it was an he norly impressive victory. but that doesn't mean that they have somehow fundamentally altered the landscape in permanent ways. >> and job grisham is here with a new book, a collection of short stories. >> it is more about people. more about the small town people. many of whom are struggling. many of whom have had a lot of miss erie, a lot of hope. it's about small town lawyers and the crazy things they do out of desperation. all stuff i saw firsthand many years ago. >> rose: mohamed elbaradei, john harris, john grisham next. >> funding for charlie rose has been provid
important to the united states? >>> india is going to be central to what we want to do in the world. >>> also, a disturbing new trend. police say they can't keep track of all of the registered sex offenders. there are just too many to keep an eye on. the internet provides easy prey. how can you keep your family safe? >>> good evening, and thanks for joining us. at this hour, we're waiting for the prime minister of india, manmohan singh, to arrive at the white house. president obama and the first lady will pay invitation to the first dinner. the list includes hollywood stars and business chiefs. 320 people will gather under a white house tent in the south lawn. singer jennifer hudson will headline the event. the symphony orchestra and the marine band will also perform. earlier today, president obama met with the indian prime minister and called them natural allies. topping the topics, global warming and trade. president obama has promised to visit india next year. >>> now to president obama's big decision on the war in afghanistan. the president said today he plans on finishing the j
at mcgill. we moved back to the united states when i was a baby and lived there till i was five in rochester, new york. this was after it had become safe for war resisters. they both decided they preferred it in canada. my father preferred the single payer health care system. my mother was working for the national film board, which is a public institution that allowed her to make the political films that she wanted to make. they left the u.s. because of the war in vietnam, but they stayed in canada because of the social programs. >> do you remember when you first learned of this story and it sunk in? >> in canada, you did not have to be rich to get sick. i did understand that it was unfair that people were denied access to medicine because they did not have money to pay. as a doctor, my father preferred to work in a system whereby money did not have anything to do with the care that you received. i have dual citizenship. it was our nuclear family that moved to canada. my grandparents were in the united states. we were always going back and forth over the border. i was always aware of the th
to the import of work ahead, and thank you for coming today. may god continue to bless the united states of america. [applause] [captioning performed by national captioning institute] [captions copyright national cable satellite corp. 2009] >> still to come, a discussion on attorney general eric holder's announcement to hold civilian trial support 9/11 plotters in new york city. after that, today's memorial service for pulitzer prize winner jack nelson. later, another chance to see former president george w. bush reflect on his a-year presidency and decisions made during his administration. the u.s. house is back in session tomorrow at 2:00 eastern for legislative business. live coverage of the house is on c-span. the senate also returns tomorrow, continuing work on fiscal year 2010 federal spending for the veterans department and military construction. majority leader harry reid has said the senate may began its healthcare debate later in the week. the senate will gavel in at 2:00 p.m. eastern. live coverage on c-span2. >> c-span's 2010 student camp contest is here. the top prize is $5,
>>> this is "gps" the global public square. welcome to our viewers in the united states and around the world. i'm fareed zakaria coming to you this week from london. we begin the show wan exclusive interview with maziar bahari "the newsweek" reporter who spent four months in an iranian prison. he's written about it in this week's "newsweek." he has a harrowing, moving tale to tell. and then the main event. i'm just back from new deli where i spoke with the prime minister of india manmolian singh. let's get started. everyone has forgotten you, those were words maziar bahari heard every day from interrogators during the four months he spent in solitary confine in the an iranian prison. maziar is my colleague, a fine journalist who works for "newsweek" he's also an award-winning filmmaker. he was arrested along with hundreds of others during the protests that followed iran's disputed election. the end of his ordeal came in october when he was released on bail of $3 billion reales, equal to $300,000 american dollars. he flew back to his home in london just days before his wife paola ga
square. welcome to our viewers in the united states and around the world. i'm fareed zakaria coming to you this week from london. we begin the show with an exclusive interview with maziar bahari, the "newsweek" reporter who spent four months in an iranian prison. he has written about it in this week's "newsweek." he has a harrowing, moving tale to tell. and then the main event. i'm just back from new delhi where i spoke with the prime minister of india manmohan singh. in his only television interview on his trip to washington, d.c. let's get started. -- captions by vitac -- www.vitac.com >>> everyone has forgotten you. those were words maziar bahari heard every day from interrogators during the four months he spent in solitary confinement in an iranian prison. maziar is my colleague, a fine journalist who works for "newsweek." he's also an award-winning filmmaker. he was arrested along with hundreds of others during the protests that followed iran's disputed election. the end of his ordeal came in october when he was released on bail of $3 billion reales, equal to 300,000 american d
with the united states both economic and security. the obama administration really doesn't want to revisit all of that, but president obama said on the record he understand that a new party coming to power will want to take a look at all the underlying agreements negotiated with the united states by the liberal democratic party. the big issues that will be on the table between these two leaders -- climate change, north korea, and trade. one other issue, of course, is afghanistan with the democratic party of japan came in, the prime minister decided to end a long-standing refueling operation the japanese were conducting with vessels in the indian ocean. but in exchange, the japanese government has put up funds in reconstruction aid. botin the main, this summit, the second time the two leaders have met is not going to produce any new u.s.-japanese announcement on any of the issues i discussed but it will be an opportunity for the two to discuss trade, north korea and climate change. steve: major, just a moment ago the white house office of the press secretary released something. apparently the u
years between iran and the united states in geneva last month. he is now involved in the draft agreement between iran, the united states, russia and france to process iran's uranium stockpiles outside the country. there are reports today that progress on the deal is being held up by iran's ongoing internal political crisis. this week dr. elbaradei called the current mont a unique and fleeting opportunity to reverse course from confrontation to cooperation with iran. we want to talk about all of that and i am very pleased to have him back at this table. welcome. >> charlie, it is great to be here again. >> rose: all right. let me just start. tell me where you think the moment is. >> well, the moment is a historic critical moment, charlie, that this is for the first time i see a genuine desire by the president of the united states and by the iranian leadership to engage in a genuine dialogue. it's after 50 years of animosity, of distrust. and that's why we have this difficulty today. the it is a symbolic gesture but it could be the first step in a broad dialogue that eventually could integ
and shakers of the united states of america. that is why i am here. that is why i am doing this luncheon. i feel like -- the gratitude is out of this world right now for having me do this. it really quick, i want to thank everybody for this honor. i want to thank you for inviting me to speak. the recorders of the industry and all of the change agents, you, the press, has a very special responsibility, and that is to be a mirror for us to see ourselves, our community, our country, and the rest of the world, and a truly respect the rule that you play in our system. i am sure that many of you are asking why would i want to speak at the national press club in washington, d.c., and why would they invite me? i make my living by stringing together verses or playing a part in some movie or television series that you may all have seen, "law and order," by the way. what would ludacris have to say? what would i have to say about leadership? i am going to say a lot of different things, so take what i say a word for word. you wonder if i plan to run for office, maybe for president in 2012. you do not ha
. . every industrialized country has that system except the united states. we are going to change that. national polls show that the majority of doctors and the majority of americans favor a single payer system. that is why six months ago, we went to capitol hill. when senator baucus opened that first day of hearing in may, i stood up and said, excuse me, sir, why have you taken single payer off the table? why have you not allowed one doctor testify for single payer? baucus ordered us arrested. one by one, margaret, kevin, carol, and four others stood up and confronted baucus. and one by one we were all arrested and charged with disruption of congress. in a plea deal earlier this year, we agreed not to disrupt congress throughout the end of this year. since that day in may, baucus and harry reid in the senate, and nancy pelosi and steny hoyer in the house have cobbled together incomprehensible legislation. it is convoluted and confusing. but one thing is clear -- president obama and the democrats have cut a dirty deal with the health insurance and pharmaceutical industries. obama took
effect. a recent study by our national academy of sciences found that here in the united states burning fossil fuels leads to almost 120 billion dollars in health costs a year. most of those costs are premature deaths, and we know that the cost in human lives can be even higher in countries we merging economies that have fewer resources to improve air quality. for all of these reasons, president obama and i understand that we cannot wait any longer to act. president obama has made it clear that he's committed to passing comprehensive energy and climate legislation that will create millions of new jobs and secure clean energy sources that are made in america and work for america. but in the meantime, we're looking for ways that we can start reducing this threat right now. last friday i saw some of you at a white house stakeholder briefing i hosted with lisa jackson, the administrator of our environmental protection agency. at that briefing we talked about many of the steps my department is taking in this area from funding research on the health costs of greenhouse gas emissions to invest
service is enshrined in the constitution of the united states. we have a law that says the postal service should produce universal service. we have to maintain a basic service. host: joseph, independent caller. caller: one of the previous callers mentioned at the topic -- the vending machines. i look forward to going to the post office now with dread. one local post office has a giant hole in the wall covered with plywood where the vending machines used to be. when i asked one of the minister why they were gone. she said it was cost control. there's no way it can be more efficient to have all those people waiting in line. it makes no sense to me. there's something seriously wrong with the reasoning behind this kind of decision. i have seen it across the board. they're using space in the post offices for selling packages that have teddy bears and balloons on them. they should be sticking to basics, common-sense service. if i can avoid going to the post office, i will do it. they might as well -- it is just a nightmare. it is a baffling ordeal. guest: i am sorry to your use say that. you ar
for abbas. >> translator: the stated position of the united states in relation to settlements in the annexation of jerusalem have been well-known and appreciated by us. however, we were surprised by their favoring of the israeli position. >> reporter: but obama's been talking up a possible breakthrough in middle east peace going back before his cairo speech. palestinians fear obama won't be able to encourage israel to make the other compromises necessary to complete a final peace deal. a leading palestinian candidate to fill abbas' shoes put it this way -- >> i think this announcement is a declaration of the failure of efforts for true peace process, due to the israeli policy of expanding and continuing settlements and the failure of the united states to take an impartial position. >> reporter: now abbas has had enou and said he won't stand for re-election. it remains to be seen if the u.s. moves to try to keep him or prefers to look to the future withnother palestinian head of state, in the early part of next year. john tarat, al jazeera, washington. >> for more on the middle
to be very important. but the biggest thing is the united states is going to do well. i mean, we can't move the railroad to china or india. they haven't figured out how to do that. so sort of like the song of new york-- we have to make it here or we can't make it anywhere. >> rose: frank sinatra. >> but it does move move a ton of good 470 miles on one gallon of diesel. a train replaces 280 trucks on the road. it emidst far less into the atmosphere that's damaging than trucking, and it moves-- i'm talking about the whole rail industry-- it moves 40% of the good. >> rose: and you have new ports of entry like houston. >> and we're going to have more people in this country and they're going to be using more kdz gdz over time. sure, there's a bad year from time to time. in the next 100 years there will probably be 15 bad years and i don't know what order they'll appear but i know the railroads will be essential. >> rose: when you called charlie munger and said i'm thinking about this, did he say right on warren? >> if charlie said right on warren, i would figure it would be a wrong number. that
in this new media. when somebody stands up in the congress of the united states during the state of the union and said, " ." >> nobody in the caucus supported what he did -- "you lie." >> nobody in the caucus supported what he did. the civility is not news. we try not to bash the media, hillary. we had an earlier conversation that talk about immigration reform where a truly bipartisan group of senators get together and all slated then, not quite, but there were in large number of democratic and republican senators working on it. that was in 2007. john mccain was simultaneously running for president. he and senator kennedy were the two leaders, the co-authors of the bill. you never saw them together in public however. kennedy said to mccain, look, we cannot show up in tv cameras together or you will lose new hampshire. it is how the press promotes incivility. >> the sense of being in the political minority, the only way you get hurt is to be no easier and more obnoxious. clearly, democrats, we did that -- we talked a lot about this during george bush's presidency. now republicans are doing a t
visited a joint united states/israeli mssile defense mauver. therthey're preparing for all eventualities. rocket and missile attacks o israel from iran, syriare leban and gaza. >> thehreat is new and the fact is our foes are being prared to give a new respse. >> the new respons is the iron me anti-missilesystem. it will be dloyed in less than a year. but the fact that remains is fr now on, in any future israeli onflict, from the north or the south, the heart of the nation tel aviv wl be under thre. >>> today milan, aly, there was a landma court ruling regarding a program run by the centl intelligence agenc know as extraordinary ndition. under th program, terro suspects weresecretly detained and flown t foreign countrie for interrogation that sohave d. today an italian judge convicted 23 americans o kidnaing an egypan cleric from a milan street in 2003 in one such opation. the ciahas decned to comnt the case and all of the americs were tried in their absence. nevertheless, th judge immediely sentenced 22 ofhe americans toive years in jail. anotr american, the former cia station chiefin m
militants who could go violent. we don't have that type of a threat in the united states, but we do have one, i mean, that's pretty obvious and i think we have taken a little bit too lightly, the dangers of islamic militant propaganda in the united states. the extent to which mosques in the united states can reinforce that-- these attitudes. so, it is something that requires a lot more effort, i think, on the part of the bureau. >> what are the triggering episodes that inspire a young, young muslim americans to go over to al-qaeda? and i'm thinking in particular of this recent somali episode because it seems to some of them were radicalized, if that's the right word, by the invasion of ethiopia of somalia in 2007 which the united states supported. can it be just one event just like that? yes, i mean, there are many factors that obviously come into play and there have been some excellent studies looking islamic militants, particularly those affiliated in europe, and you do tend to see a pattern and that first of all, there tends to be, there's something deeply personal that strikes the believ
to you first, what is the single biggest challenge for the president of the united states when he speaks to the united states, ed rollins? >> how long we're going to be there and equally as important what is the mission and how is the mission different than it was two years ago or four years ago. dechl democrats have to be convinced the president's party is very divided on this issue. i think he'll have the republican support he needs, but at the end of day, if this is not a bipartisan effort long-term they won't get the resources and funding to make it work. >> donna brazile, to ed rollins' point, the toughest sales job is the anti-war left of the democratic party. how does the president convince them to support him or keep quiet of the criticism? >> public support of the war has diminished across the board not just with the left, across the country and even across the world where we depend on troops from other countries to help us in afghanistan. the president gave a very thorough speech back in march, laying out our objectives. he said it was to dismantle, disrupt and destroy al qaeda
's making the choice for you. the u.s. -- the united states, america, is the world's largest economy. it's three times larger than our closest competitor, japan. and it's larger than the economies of japan, china, germany, and great britain combined. and we got there through innovation. we got there through choice. we got there through competition. we got there through individual initiative and responsibility. not government control and management. as we have seen time after time, when you substitute a government controlled and run program for individual choice, the cost goes up, the quality goes down. and when it comes to health care, there's nothing more important than quality and choice. given the choice, i'll always place my faith in the individual not the government and this time is no different. no different with the credit card legislation, no different with the health care legislation. mr. chairman, let me conclude by saying many of my colleagues in this body, both republicans and democrats, are going to come in and they are going to vote for this legislation today. they are goin
of the united states to take a look at your antitrust exemption. york $8 billion organization has not taken seriously responsibility to the players. a fact of the matter is, if yes, people want to play. they are going to be injured and we know that no matter what kind of helmet you build, no matter what kind of equipment that you have, it is a dangerous sport. people are going to be injured. the only question is, what you going to do -- are you going to pay the injured player and their family for the injuries that they have received and how can you be a multi-billion operation? se profits, but i think the responsibility of this congress is to take a look at that anti--trust exemption that you have. in my estimation, take it away. i yield back the balance of my time. >> i thank the gentlewoman for her modest suggestions. [laughter] the chair recognizes howard from north carolina. >> thank you, mr. chairman. what does the alumni association have to say to active pro, college and high school players about the importance of early and completely presenting to team physicians any sims that may ha
think if you add up the troops that the united states will commit as well as those that nato countries are going to commit and that's still a work in progress on the latter. i'm told by senior defense officials that general mcchrystal will be more or less satisfied with the number that he believes he needs to do the counterinsurgency campaign that he laid out in his strategic assessment earlier this year. >> suarez: now, it takes a while to get everybody deployed, doesn't it? >> it does. it will take several months, actually several weeks for the first troops. but the marines that you mentioned will be going in first early next year to be followed soon after by a number of... several hundred perhaps up to a thousand army trainers. these will be doing the initial training of afghan recruits. the recruits will then be put into their units and partnered with american units on the ground. this will be a phased deployment going over the next 12 to 18 months. the troops that you mention in your broadcast, up to some 30,000 or so will be phased in over that time frame. >> suarez: once all tho
hopelessly deadlocked, can a new jewish lobby here in the united states shake up the status quo in washington, put its stamp on u.s. policy and rival apac? jeremy ben-ami sits down with me for a face-to-face debate on u.s.-israel policy with a member of the old guard. we begin with jay street. take a look at who addressed its opening national conference. >> mr. ben-ami, friends, i'm delighted to have this chance to say a few words to you tonight. let me congratulate you all on this important gathering. your theme says it all. driving change, securing peace. for too long we have not driven change. the palestinian-israeli conflict goes on into a seventh decade. peace has not been secured. and neither side has security. >> king abdullah of jordan is one of america's key allies, and never before has an arab head of state addressed the national conference of a major jewish lobby. so is the balance of power about to shift? i sat down with jeremy ben-ami, executive director of j street and david harris, the executive director of the ajc, american jewish committee. we did invited aipac to participate
number of people in the united states who are related to each other and we just don't know it. >> tonight the woman who uncovered michelle obama's family ties will give us more detail and dig into my own roots. >> this, for example, is your grandmother. >>> this is your only source for news, cnn prime time begins now. here's campbell brown. >>> hi there, everybody. we start tonight, as always, with the mashup. we're watching it all so you don't have to and tonight after weeks of debate at the white house about what to do in afghanistan, the president has made a decision. the pentagon right now is drawing up plans to send about 34,000 u.s. troops to afghanistan and what that means is that young men and women from around the country will be packing up and shipping out very soon. president obama is expected to make the official announcement next tuesday in a prime time address. >> it is my intention to finish the job, and i feel confident when the american people hear a clear rationale for what we're doing there and how we intend to achieve our goals that they will be supportive. >> i antici
that we have had the highest deficit in the history of the united states, $1. trillion, -- the $1.4 trillion, the pelosi plan comes in weighing at $1 trillion. when we just got unemployment figures back, think about this, the president with an 8.5% unemployment rate pushes upon the congress a $787 billion stimulus bill and now unemployment has gone from 8.5% to 10.2% and in so many other pockets of america it's 14%, 15% and 16%. where are the jobs? why have we taken the focus off the main thing, the economy? why are we going down the track of government takeover of health care? and massive mandates on individuals, doctors and small businesses? just like china. mr. speaker, 1,900 pages, it's ridiculous. the republican alternative, which is not even half, not even 25%, but i'd say maybe 15% in size, weighing in at say maybe a mere $1 -- 150 pages, bring more competition for individuals, association health care plan to let small businesses pool together, expansion of health savings accounts, medical malpractice reform to reduce frivolous lawsuits. this is the republican alternative a
will also talk about the growth of islamic radicalism within the united states. all those topics and your calls, starting tomorrow at 7:00. [captioning performed by national captioning institute] [captions copyright national cable satellite corp. 2009] . >> here is what is ahead. next, a look at the history of the atomic bomb. then a panel discussion on global security after the fall of the berlin wall. later, a review of the 2008 elections. saturday, a look back at the cuban missile crisis with former kennedy advisers ted sorensen and karaoke secret have war threats been over hyped in the post cold-war world? a university of virginia panel on how the political process has been affected by the internet. and facebook founder chris hughes on how social networking is changing the political process. this holiday weekend on c-span. >> on this vote, the yeahs are 60, the nays are 39. the motion is agreed to. >> with that vote, the senate moves the health care bill to the floor. starting monday and through december, follow the entire debate, and how the bill would affect access to medical care,
basically has completely destroyed the power of the united states by his namby-pamby stuff on intelligence, by his huge budget deficit and gigantic expansion of the debt. he's made the united states into a beg ar nation. and if you like obama, you think he's weak. if you don't like him, you think he's just wrong and sometimes bad intentioned. i learned something the other day that just blew my minds. obama announced that he wasn't going to put missiles in poland, and he did that on september 17. now, apart from my wife's birthday, that date has no significance to me. but to the polls it does. it was the date russia invaded poland in 1939. and to remove the missile shield on that gate was effectively telling the russians, come on in, she's yours. and obama knew it. had to have known it. that state department would have flagged that and said don't do it on the 17th. he did it to send a message to russia saying, she's all yours, kid. sean: that's a frightening thought. dick, good to see you. don't forget, we're going to have the first cable exclusive interview with sarah palin on her brand-ne
the united states and india have not always been one. during the cold war, many saw india as unfriendly, which it might have been. during -- at the end of the cold war, there were opportunities to securitized. in the past several years, there has been a lifting of sanctions culminating in the historic civil nuclear accord. now, there@@@@@@h@ @ @ @ @ @ @ r strategic partnership. there is a need for wide ranging consultation to in grain habits of consultation -- to ingrain minister for being here. i want to welcome his entire delegation, including his most able ambassador and want to thank the gentleman standing here, lee hamilton, who is president and director of the woodrow wilson international center. i could not be more pleased to introduce the prime minister. lee hamilton resented the ninth district in the u.s. house of representatives and he is a model of what a legislator of to be. -- ought to be. congressman hamilton? [applause] >> good evening to you all and thank you for coming. i told the prime minister a moment ago that he was appearing before an extraordinary washington audie
-- and i would say enthusiastic role by the united states of america, these negotiations will not yield the kind of the kind of results that we are looking for. true, we would have hoped that the united states of america would have been more ambitious than what it has indicated. >> reporter: india is also one of the world's largest producers of greenhouse gas emissions, but is a relative newcomer to an industrialized economy. saran says the country has concerns that a climate agreement could stifle economic development. >> for us, climate change is not just a separate issue, it is intermixed with our developmental, you know, issues itself. so how we balance, you know, the problem of climate change with the other stresses and strains that the country is going through as this process of social and economic transformation, we would hope that there is some understanding of that challenge that we face. >> reporter: meantime, a series of studies released today in the british medical journal "the lancet" could give another boost to advocates of addressing climate change. the studies found that
.ncicap.org-- >> the attorney general of the united states kicked up a firestorm when he announced his decision to try the accused architect of the 9/11 attacks and four other men in u.s. federal court not far from ground zero, try them in a civilian court, not by military tribunal. he caught hell for the decision on capitol hill this week. >> how could you be more likely to get a conviction in federal court when khalid sheik mohammed has already asked to plead guilty before a military commission and be executed? [applause] >> i am not going to base the determination on where the case ought to be brought on what a terrorist, what a murder wants to do. he will not select the prosecution venuie, i will and i have. >> senator lindsey graham also practices military lot and says that this is a perversion of the justice system. what do you think, nina? >> i think it is a very hard decision that the attorney general made, and i would point that we have had military commissions for seven years and have not successfully brought anybody to drop because of problems with the commission. -- not successfully brough
of the united states kicked up a firestorm when he announced his decision to try the accused architect of the 9/11 attacks in new york federal court, not far from ground zero. try him by a civilian court, not by tribunal. >> how could you be more likely to get a conviction in federal court when khalid sheik mohammed has already asked to plead guilty before a military commission and be executed? [applause] >> i am not going to base the determination on where these cases are going to be brought on what the terrorists, what are murder wants to do. he will not select the prosecution then you -- venue. >> senator lindsey graham says this is an aversion of the justice system. what do you think, nina? >> i think it is a very hard decision that the attorney general made, and i will point out, as he did, that we have had a military commissions for seven years and we have not brought anybody to try because of problems with the commission. there is lots of evidence we don't know about and he will be convicted. but you don't think a forum this way -- you don't say a loud, "we will convict him in this one t
, the president should be aware the jobs people are worried about in the united states are getting people back to work. we have 15 million people out of work. our priorities are skewed here. we have things to take care of her at home. why are we worrying about afghanistan? it really raises questions about the extent of the pentagon's influence on the administration. >> why do you think the president is doing it? many people thought the president came from the same side of the tracks that you're on, generally speaking, in terms of the limits of u.s. power in the world and the need to rejoin the world community and not to be hawkish. what do you make of his decision? why do you think he moved that direction? >> well, i think it's going to be a tough one to defend. and you're right about the -- we've seen the limits of u.s. coercion, and this government in afghanistan is a corrupt government. everyone knows that. sooner or later, the kind of consensus government which afghanistan has had historically is going to have to be reinstituted so people in afghanistan will have control over their own des
as a citizen of the united states is just appalling. i think eric holder should have left them in guantanamo bay and be tried there. i lived in new york in 2000 and 2001. it was just terrible. for them to be tried in a federal court, it just speaks to this country to give people that do not ware uniforms, do not apply to the geneva convention to come to our country and then be given rights like a citizen. host: david, in this newspaper article, attorney general holder elected to proceed with the first u.s. criminal prosecution alleged to have been directly involved in the plot eight years ago that targeted the world trade center and pent he gone because of his full confidence in the successful outcome. tell us why you are not as convinced of the outcome? caller: i'm not confident because i believe that in our country, people are innocent until proven guilty. when you use water boarding and all these things they are trying to use against ournqq governmen why should a terrorist be given rights in our country. host: let's go to the democratic line. caller: i think they should be tried here. t
family. >> fred, fred, fred. she ran for vice president of the united states last year, she is running for president next time. let me ask you, fred, if you had to choose between sheer confidence and ability to be the next president, mitt romney, or sarah palin? who is more competent to be the next president, the next republican nominee for president? >> oh, come on, you know i'm not going to answer. i think we've got four or five -- four or five -- >> you said she is not even running. but fred, i caught you. i caught you. he said she is not even running. you -- i caught you right there. your hesitancy. you said she is not a candidate. >> you said who is more qualified. who is more qualified. >> what you've got to understand, it's better to lose with goldwater than to win with rockefeller. when the pendulum comes your way, you want the people you believe in who are going to do the things you went into politics to get done to be there, not just to be in power and say we've got an honor by our name in the white house. >> here is a question for you, fred, and you have been in the campaign
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